Nolla Cabin in Finland, a project by Finnish designer Robin Falck

Right on trend for remote holiday retreats, DECO discovers these Nordic contemporary cabins. See more in our Great Escapes feature in the Slow Living issue on shelf now.

Nolla Cabin | Vallisaari, Finland

Nolla cabin is fitted with solar panels on one side of the A-frame roof and mirrors on the other that reflect the sun to prevent the interiors from getting too hot.

Minimal impact meets maximum design in Nolla Cabin, a project by Finnish designer Robin Falck, who was called on by renewable energy company Neste to present a sustainable living solution with a negligible carbon footprint. The result is a 10m2 mobile dwelling, currently on the Helsinki island of Vallisaari in Finland, that can be easily disassembled and transported without heavy machinery. Pedestals at its base are fully adjustable, so the cabin can adapt to different types of terrain and won’t damage the land when it is removed, and all building components have been fastened together with standard screws that can be replaced if lost.

A glass wall at one end of Nolla cabin allows for abundant views of the great outdoors

Falck designed the cabin in such a way that it could be recreated by anyone from scratch and easily repaired, a choice that the designer hopes will help prevent mass consumerism, encouraging its owners to fix what they already have instead of immediately replacing it with something new. Functioning entirely on renewable energy, Nolla is fitted with solar panels on one side of the A-frame roof and mirrors on the other that reflect the sun to prevent  the interiors from getting too hot, while a glass wall at one end allows for abundant views of the great outdoors.

Vipp Shelter | Lake Immeln, Sweden

The Vipp Shelter is a self-catering cabin for two at Lake Immeln in Sweden

Known for producing high-quality steel pieces with a modern aesthetic (its iconic 1939 pedal bin is currently on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City), Danish design company Vipp has taken things a step further with the Vipp Shelter – a 55m2 steel pod infused with the brand’s identity. Functionality is key with this self-catering cabin for two at Lake Immeln in Sweden, whose pared-back design was inspired by large industrial steel creations like submarines and planes that are stripped of all unnecessary features.

The kitchen-cum-living area takes up the majority of the interior. Generous skylights allow for star gazing through the branches of trees whilst lying in bed

The kitchen-cum-living area takes up the majority of the interior, emphasising its role as the natural gathering point, and large glass sliding doors open up the space to the lake in front, blurring the lines between inside and out. A loft level encompasses a shielded-off bathroom and bedroom, where generous skylights allow for star gazing through the branches of trees whilst lying in bed. From the ladder and the mezzanine to the kitchen, bath and lamps, everything is made by Vipp and features predominantly dark tones so as not to distract from the natural surrounds. All of this combines to speak of the brand’s hotel concept of presenting ‘tailored and curated destinations that are out of the ordinary and filled with Vipp’s signature take on design’.

Large glass sliding doors open up the space to the lake in front, blurring the lines between inside and out

Original text by Karen Tennant as seen in Great Escapes, Slow Living issue.

Look for more cabin cool? See two more eco-conscious designer cabins in the Americas here, or had your fill of remote getaways and feeling the need for some urban edge? Check out our guide to Los Angeles, London and where to stay in Hong Kong.