From paint to pattern, moody to muted, this is your expert guide to incorporating colour into your home

WAYS WITH WALLS

With a little bit of know-how, wallpaper can be used to transform any interior. Wallcoverings with vertical stripes or patterns will make a ceiling appear higher and give the illusion of space, while horizontal motifs can make a room feel wider and longer. If the area you’re adorning is a compact one, go for small, tight prints as opposed to large, open patterns, which work best in expansive interiors. Add texture with wallpaper in fabrics such as grasscloth, linen and sisal, and if more light is what you’re after, try offerings with a luminescent metallic sheen.

‘AFFORDABILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY IS THE NEXT BIG THING IN FABRICS, AND PEOPLE ARE EMBRACING TEXTURES SUCH AS TWEEDS, COARSE LINENS AND VELVETS THAT BLUR THE LINES OF CONVENTION. DON’T BE SCARED OF PATTERN: INTRODUCE IT VIA ACCENTS SUCH AS SCATTER CUSHIONS OR EVEN STATEMENT FURNITURE. STICK TO TWO OR THREE CLASHES TO CREATE INTERESTING TENSION.’– GARTH WASTIE, U&G FABRICS

RETRO PALETTES

Just as in furnishings, vintage styles are making a comeback, with terracotta, ochre and rich brown tones taking centre stage on the colour front. Pair with muddy greens, African-inspired patterns and organic shapes and textures for a refreshed look

RICH SHADES

Whether used on a wall, window frame, furniture or accessories, jewel tones make a bold statement and are bang
on trend. Create contrast by offsetting emerald, indigo or amethyst hues with monochromatic styling

How to introduce saturated tones into your home

Smaller spaces such as a guest bathroom can take head-to-toe colour, so go all out and paint the walls, skirtings, ceiling and finishes the same colour. If you‘re on a budget, paint areas that will highlight your favourite features, such as the wall or mantel surrounding a fireplace or a ceiling with a standout pendant light or chandelier.

‘PAINT SHOULDN’T JUST BE ABOUT THE COLOUR THAT YOU PUT ON THE WALL, BUT RATHER HOW YOU MAKE THE MOST OF THAT COLOUR. PAIR RICH SHADES WITH NEUTRALS FOR BALANCE, SUCH AS FOREST GREEN WITH LIGHT YELLOW HUES AND INK BLUE WITH BLUSH PINK TONES.’– PALESA RAMAISA, DULUX

MUTED PASTELS

A staple in the neutral sphere, soft pastels have developed over the years to become ultra-modern and fashionable, especially when coupled with black steel, smoky glass, light timber and tactile finishes.

‘Print technology has allowed wallpaper design to push past the standard pattern repeat and be used in new ways. While a design may look unusual by itself, it can take on an entirely different meaning when placed in the correct space.’

– KEVIN FRANKENTAL, LEMON

‘From textured, dynamic prints to chinoiserie, wallpaper is breaking boundaries and being used to reinvigorate blank walls and give interiors a stylish update. Skip the feature wall idea and spread it across all four walls – wallpaper today is even being used on ceilings. A wallcovering brand that’s known for pushing the envelope is Arte, boasting unique offerings with suede padded finishes in cane and lattice designs – they’re just spectacular. When choosing what styles or designs to use in your own home, be bold – it’s only wallpaper.’– MARC SHOTLAND, HOME FABRICS

‘Making your home look and feel well curated can easily be accomplished through the use of a great geometric pattern. There’s a big movement towards revamped and modernised ancient African and Asian patterns, with muted colours such as greys, bronzes, whites, beiges and blush pinks coming out on top.’ – ROBIN SPRONG, ROBIN SPRONG WALLPAPERS

‘SOFT PASTELS ARE BIG RIGHT NOW AND WILL CONTINUE TO BE SO INTO SUMMER, ESPECIALLY ALL SHADES OF MILLENNIAL PINK – FROM SALMON TO CRUSHED BERRY, WHICH PAIR WELL WITH MINT GREEN – AS WELL AS TERRACOTTA. THE ONE-WALL WALLPAPER TREND IS OUT: RATHER OPT FOR WALLPAPER ON ALL WALLS, INCLUDING AROUND CORNERS.’ – MONIQUE VANDERLINDEN, HERTEX

Pattern play

‘Prints today are featuring classical painterly themes in unexpected colour combinations, incorporating what were previously considered to be clashing colours to create a visual vibration that’s both exciting and exhilarating.’ – Tanya Sturgeon, T&Co Fabrics

Two Tone

When painting a wall one colour in two slightly different shades, apply the darker hue on the lower area to conceal dirt and scuff marks, and ground the room. A lighter shade on top will draw the eye up and help make a space feel higher and bigger.

A two-tone wall is easy to achieve and creates depth and interest. Paint two different colours (such as Rooibos and Belle Aurore, used above), one below and one above dado height. The unlikely mix of rich, earthy reds and pink hues results in the perfect warming contrast.’ – Plascon

‘Be bold and play with colour, but also look at what colours already exist within your space. There’s often a common shade that can be identified within our personal spaces, so take a moment to identify that first. When combining clashing hues, the trick is to make use of the colour wheel – you’ll never go wrong if you pay attention to tonal, harmonious and complementary pairings.’ – Palesa Ramaisa, Dulux

‘YOU CAN EASILY ADD BRIGHT COLOURS WITHOUT MAKING HUGE CHANGES TO WHAT YOU ALREADY HAVE: CONTRAST THE COLOUR OF THE PIPING ON PLAIN-COLOURED SCATTERS, BACK A VIBRANT PATTERN WITH AN INTERESTING PLAIN, OR USE A BRIGHT RED TO FRAME A BLACK AND WHITE PRINT.’ – GAIL BUTLER, HALOGEN INTERNATIONAL

CONTRASTING BRIGHTS

A vibrant, clashing colour scheme may feel daunting, but when executed correctly, it’s a rewarding risk. The key is to give your design balance by mixing complementary shades in a range of saturated and muted tones. Alternatively, place bright patterned additions against a neutral backdrop.

Text: Karen Tennent, Compiled by: Sanri Pienaar, Assistant: Pieter von Wielligh